Emotion and its theories

The first story begins with two of your friends, Billy and Bobby. One day Billy borrows a large amount of money from you. But when he repeatedly fails to pay it back, you realize that your friendship with him is ruined, and you lose contact with him for several years. Then one afternoon, when you start to prepare dinner and reach into your cupboard, a can of soup falls off the top shelf and conks you on the head.

Emotion and its theories

In order to carry out correct behaviour—that is to say, correct in relation to Emotion and its theories survival of the individual—humans have developed innate drives, desires, and emotions and the ability to remember and learn.

Such are angerpity, fear and the like, with their opposites. Some emotions are very specific, insofar as they concern a particular person, object, or situation. Others, such as distress, joy, or depressionare very general.

Some emotions are very brief and barely conscious, such as a sudden flush of embarrassment or a burst of anger. An emotion may have pronounced physical accompaniments, such as a facial expressionor it may be invisible to observers. An emotion may be socially appropriate or inappropriate.

It may even be socially obligatory—e. Panic and fear, for example, are often thought to be kindred emotions, but there is a significant difference between the panic that is manifested in an irrational fear or a phobia and an intelligent fear—such as the fear of nuclear war—which requires a good deal of information and analysis.

Terror and horror, two other kindred emotions, are nevertheless distinct from fear. Or consider the huge family of hostile emotions akin to anger: The great variety and abundance of emotions suggest that the category of emotion may not be a single class of psychological phenomena but a large family of loosely related mental states and processes.

Although love and hate, for example, are often conceived of as polar opposites, it is worth noting as the plots of so many novels and dramas have made clear that they frequently coexist not as opposites but as complements. Moreover, love is often painful and destructive, and hatred, sometimes, can be positive.

Anger is indeed a negative feeling if not a hostile one directed toward another person, but it can be edifying for the person who is angry, and, in the appropriate context —a context in which one ought to be angry—it can have beneficial effects on a situation or a relationship.

Thus, the feminist movement took a major step forward when women realized that they had a right to be angry and much to be angry about. It may be, as Aristotle noted, that emotions are accompanied by pleasure or pain often bothbut they are too complex and often too subtle to be classified on that basis alone.

The study of emotions was long the province of ethics. For Aristotle, having the right amount of the right emotion in the right circumstances is the key to virtuous behaviour.

Although moral thinking about emotions has always been concerned with emotional extremes and malformations, as in psychopathology and madness, those phenomena have never been the primary reason for interest in the emotions.

As Aristotle and the medieval moralists understood quite well, emotions are essential to a healthy human existence, and it is for that reason that their malfunction is so serious.

The Triumph of St. Love, respect, and compassion, for example, are the essential emotional ingredients of interpersonal relations and concerns. Emotions motivate moral as well as immoral behaviour, and they play an essential role in creativity and in scientific curiosity.

For many people, emotions are stimulated and provoked by beauty in the arts and nature, and there is no aesthetic sensibility without emotion. Emotions as well as the physical senses shape the basic processes of perception and memory and influence the ways in which people conceive and interpret the world around them psychologists have long known that what one notices and remembers depends to a great extent on what one cares about.

The structure of emotions Emotions have been studied in several scientific disciplines—e. As a result, distinctive perspectives on emotion have emerged, appropriate to the complexity and variety of the emotions themselves.The Repressed Memory Debate.

Anyway, Freud’s speculative theories have today been taken up in the context of allegations of childhood sexual abuse; i.e., when an older child or adult suddenly “remembers” having been abused in childhood by some particular person, usually a metin2sell.com camps are clearly divided here, some saying that these things happen all the time and that they reflect.

An Interview with Andrea Scarantino (November ) Lisa Feldman Barrett is University Distinguished Professor of Psychology and director of the Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory at Northeastern University.

Emotion and its theories

She received the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award in , and was elected fellow to the Royal Society of Canada in The theory of constructed emotion: an active inference account of interoception and categorization Lisa Feldman Barrett1,2,3 1Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA, 2Athinoula, A.

Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging and 3Psychiatric Neuroimaging Division, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, .

Etymology, definitions, and differentiation. The word "emotion" dates back to , when it was adapted from the French word émouvoir, which means "to stir up".However, the earliest precursors of the word likely date back to the very origins of language. Color Emotion Guide.

Humans love color. In kindergarten, everyone wants to have the biggest box of crayons or the largest selection of colored pencils.

An Interview with Andrea Scarantino (November ) Lisa Feldman Barrett is University Distinguished Professor of Psychology and director of the Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory at Northeastern University.

She received the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award in , and was elected fellow to the Royal Society of Canada in

Emotion, Theories of | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy